Bridgnorth Castle

Attraction in Bridgnorth, Shropshire

Contact Details

Tel: 01746 762231

Web: www.shropshiretourism.info/castles/bridgnorth

Email: bridgnorth.tourism@shropshire-cc.gov.uk

Postal Address:
Bridgnorth Town Council
College House
Bridgnorth
Shropshire
WV16 4EJ

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Description Facilities Directions

Description

The remains of Bridgnoth Castle are set on a cliff by the side of the River Severn.

Today the castle is little more than a ruin, comprising of a 70 foot tall, 12th century Norman tower and some other small stonework built in the time of Henry II. The tower leans at an alarming angle of 15 degrees, three times greater than that of the leaning tower of Pisa. This is due to an attempt to blow it up during the Civil War.

The castle was founded in 1101 by Robert de Belleme, who is reputed to have been a very nasty character. He tortured men and women and even is reported to have gouged his godson's eyes out with his bare fingernails. He was the son of the French Earl, Roger de Montgomery, and was also a rich and powerful Norman baron who succeeded his father to become the Earl of Shrewsbury. Belleme let his people build their own houses in the outer bailey of the castle, the evidence of which can still be seen in Bridgnorth's East and West Castle Streets. Belleme supported the Duke of Normandy in his attempts to depose King Henry I and take the thrown of England

During the Civil war, Bridgnorth was one of the Midlands main Royalist strongholds, and was an obvious target for attack by Parliamentarians. In 1102, the Royalists constructed a large earthwork on the south-west side of the Severn Valley, from which they could fire catapults into the castle. Following a three week siege the commander in charge of the castle surrendered to the Royalists who then deported Robert de Belleme back to France. After this the castle became the property of the crown, and subsequently passed through many different hands, resulting in it deteriorating into a very poor state. By the 14th century the castle had lost most of its strategic importance and with the onset of the Black Death in Britain the castle was largely forgotten. By the 15th and 16th centuries the castle had fallen into a ruined state. By 1642 many Royalist troops were garrisoned there. By 1646 Cromwell's roundheads arrived with orders to take Bridgnorth for the Parliamentarians

The Royalist troops retreated to the castle and set fire the houses in Bridgnorth High Street in the hope it would hinder the progress of the roundheads. The fire spread quickly to the surrounding buildings and eventually took St Leonard's Church which was being used as Cromwell's gunpowder store. The engulfing explosion reduced most of Bridgnorth's High Town to burnt cinders. On the 26th April 1646 the town was surrendered to Parliament. Cromwell ordered that the castle be demolished and by 1647 it was left as a few remnants of the structure that had once stood there. The Parliamentarians left it much as it is today, the stone from the castle taken and used to repair the towns damaged buildings

Facilities

Picnic Site Toilets for Disabled Visitors Ramp/Level Access All Areas Accessible to Disabled Visitors Educational Visits Accepted Guide Dogs Permitted

Directions

From the A458. Situated in Castle grounds, adjacent to the Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Contact Details

Tel: 01746 762231

Web: Visit Website

Email: bridgnorth.tourism@shropshire-cc.gov.uk

Postal Address:

Bridgnorth Town Council

College House

Bridgnorth

Shropshire

WV16 4EJ

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Disclaimer

The details displayed on this page are copyright protected to Shropshire Tourism and are correct at the time of publication. Shropshire Tourism would like to advise all visitors to check prices & opening times with the venue prior to traveling in case of changes that might have occured since the publication of this page. Whilst Shropshire Tourism endeavours to ensure that the information on this site is correct, no warranty, express or implied, is given as to its accuracy and Shropshire Tourism does not accept any liability for error or omission. The directions above are for planning purposes only and should be used alongside a general roadmap or satnav system. Variables such as road/construction works, traffic, weather conditions etc may cause alterations to the route.

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